1. May, 2017

Interesting article!

http://www.bjjee.com/videos/john-danahers-precious-advice-on-how-to-improve-in-jiu-jitsu/

For those of you who want to train/learn more about BJJ (ground Jiu Jitsu).... my Thursday night class is made up of a combination of a lovely general total body Stretch & roll workout routine to music, good for repetition skills, good for instilling some positive pro-active muscle & head/mind work, great for being 'in the moment' and for allowing your mind to have some lovely chill-out headspace :) being able to workout but relax mentally while you are doing the routine as well.

But it also paves the way for you to be able to learn some ginastica yoga (movement yoga basically) and to learn some Jiu Jitsu: for becoming confident again about being on the ground, for knowing how to defend yourself on the ground, for learning how to cope in the most uncomfortable of positions, and how to survive both physically and mentally.

The linked article talks about training Jiu Jitsu and how you should train. If you want to compete, or if you want to do it as a hobby like chess, then you should do what the article says: train technical, to defeat.... But... if you are looking at this from a women's self defence/protection perspective then while it is good to know some technique, you should always remember that technique is fine motor skills, we need to tap into our minds more to access that information to use it... therefore unless we drill those techniques constantly and consistently over and over again, like everyday of every week of every single month of every single year, our chances of being able to tap into our fine motor skills/those techniques in an 'attack/assault' situation are going to be minimal - because in that kind of situation, it is our gross motor skills (the next level down in our minds/heads) that are activated: our heads/minds need to focus on gross (not fine) motor skills only, to stop us from spacing out even more and to stop us from trying things which will simply not be able to work and to stop us from wasting energy and time that we can't afford to lose.

Learning technique does have its place and can play its part in self defence... you should never discount it completely... I actually think that one thing that can sometimes get overlooked is that people only tend to think of technique on a physical level: But if you know enough technique, if you practice it enough to be able to work out what is going to work for you: by that I mean what you could definitely look to try... then technique can be good in helping you to remain calm in a bad situation, it can help to keep you focused mentally. You should never however allow yourself to be too calm with it, to become too focussed on the technique, to think you are definitely going to be able to make it work - it's difficult enough after an attack, thinking in our heads that maybe we should have been able to have done more to stop it from happening. But if you go into a situation pinning everything you have on techniques you have learned, and then for some reason, the guy is heavier than you, stronger than you, scares you mentally, or you find yourself completely shut down by what's happening, you don't want the technique to make you think that you failed to protect yourself. 

With that in mind, the most important words in the whole of the linked article for me and ladies...what jumped off the page... why I train... if you are looking to learn any kind of ground work/Jiu Jitsu for self defence, you should always ensure that you train to make it difficult for someone to submit you. You should train with lions, so that if you ever find yourself in an 'attack/assault' situation, you can become like a lion too.

You should train to learn how to make it difficult for someone to submit you first... then when that's been drilled enough.. you can begin to look at training technical, learning how to defend/escape if someone uses a technique on you... you should always train to survive!